Homily by Fr. Michael for 11/18/18 – A Time Unsurpassed in Distress

+A TIME UNSURPASSED IN DISTRESS                        33 Sunday B, 2018  

These words from the book of the Prophet Daniel tell of the last times, of when this world is coming to an end. Jesus, in our gospel, speaks of a great tribulation, when the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light, the end of time. Our readings this morning are clearly apocalyptic as is fitting enough when we move closer to the end of the liturgical year.

There are many today warning us of indications of the end of this world, of conflicts arising all around us whether between Nations or within society itself. One thinks of the political polarization in this country, the growing divide between rich and poor, racial conflicts that go on. One sees the terrible effect of sexual abuse within the Church, the growing reluctance to be a committed member of a Church or believing community. As one listens to news of floods, of the terrible fires in California, we ask ourselves whether our earth a safe place to live? It is clearly a time to take stock of our lives, to realize that this life is passing quickly and we do well to keep in view Christ’s promise of everlasting life for those who believe in him.

We need not live in fear if we are doing all that we can to be true to our Christian faith. St Benedict says that God is saying to each of us that “If you desire true and eternal life,…turn away from evil and do good; let peace be your quest and aim. Once you have done this, my eyes will be upon you and my ears will listen for your prayers; and even before you ask me, I will say to you; Here I am.” There is the story told of St Francis working in his garden. A friar asked him “What would you be doing now if you knew that Jesus was coming back today?” Francis replied, “I would keep hoeing my garden.” Francis felt that he was doing the best he could for that moment and needed nothing more.

Each one of us lives at a different point in life and knows that God could come at any time. If our lives reflect this awareness, we will do all we can to be prepared. What prayer does and what the Eucharist is designed to do is to help us live fully in this moment of Christ’s coming. Christ’s sacrifice, the author of the letter to the Hebrews tells us “has made perfect forever those who are being consecrated.” There is made present at this altar daily the one eternal sacrifice, the one perfect act of love that transforms everyone who believes in what God has done for us in Jesus.

This love is ready to become present and fully active in every difficult situation of our lives, for God knows far better than we that we can do nothing of eternal value without the gift of grace. And here is perfect freedom, to know the depth of God’s love for us and to allow it to be present each moment of our lives.

 

Dan 12:1-3; Heb 10:11-14, 18; Mk 13: 24-32